Hi-Fructose Magazine

  • by Andy Smith
    Rendered just in black inks, Pony Reinhardt’s are riveting tethers to the natural world. The tattoo artist and owner of Portland’s Tenderfoot Studios describes herself as “an astral ruffian, thriving in the wilderness of the lost and found nebulae and dripping carbon monoxide” and her “art is a cosmic cataclysm of the Ghastly Phantastic.” That […]
  • by Andy Smith
    Gregory Ferrand’s cinematic paintings, often laced with anachronisms, speak to a broader sense of isolation belonging to an otherwise social species. The artist's academic background in film is evident throughout his works, with a full-frame attention to mood and detail. Among the artist’s other influences: Mexican muralists, comic books, and quite evident below, a mid-19th-century […]
  • by Andy Smith
    Keiichi Tanaami’s wild sculptures and mixed-media works currently inhabit Jeffrey Deitch's New York location, as an extension of its "Tokyo Pop Underground" group show. The Hi-Fructose Vol. 38 cover artist is featured at the space until Nov. 2. We last mentioned Tanaami on our site here, in a story on his collaboration with artist Oliver […]
  • by Andy Smith
    Nina Bunjevac’s masterful stippled drawings have appeared as single works, portraiture, comic books, tarot cards, commercial illustration, and other forms. All showcase the Canada-born artist’s command of shadows and subtlety, with the ability to move between the macabre and the humorous within a single frame. Earlier this year, she released her latest graphic novel, "Bezimena," […]
  • by Andy Smith
    Super Future Kid’s candy-colored paintings and sculptures fill Gallery Poulsen later this month with her new show, "Smells Like Teenage Armpit.” The artist says that all of the dimension-hopping paintings, crafted in acrylics and spraypaint, “started out as ideas I had just before falling asleep in my bed.” The show kicks off on Oct. 26 […]
  • by Andy Smith
    With "Bone Pendulum in Motley" at Freight+Volume Gallery, Johnston Foster offers new, wild assemblages made from metal hardware, textiles and plastics, PVC, yoga mats, electrical wires, and other materials typically reserved for home renovation projects. Kicking off tomorrow and running through Nov. 10 at the gallery, several new pieces are included in the show. More
  • by Andy Smith
    In his riveting, surreal ink drawings, Peter Striffolino builds new creatures from humanity’s building blocks. Though the Los Angeles artist's practice encompasses these drawings, paintings, and animations, we'll be taking a look at his ink work in this post. In his monochromatic work, Striffolino’s talents in texturing and linework is on display. More
  • by Andy Smith
    Scotland-based artist Ade Adesina creates massive linocut prints that he says reflect on both his African roots and European culture, “producing work that makes people reflect on the past, present and the future.” His practice linocuts, woodcuts, sculpture, and other disciplines. Known for enormous cityscapes and landscapes, recent work also features his own sensibility applied […]
  • by Andy Smith
    In Jillian Denby’s voyeuristic, yet expansive paintings, people engage in both everyday activity as well as the unexpected. When viewed as a whole, her scenes offer a connectedness between its parties that each likely couldn’t see themselves. With works like "Genius of the River Chases Away The Frenzy of Art," the reality of what’s human […]
  • by Andy Smith
    Kara Walker's recent Hyundai Commission is a 45-foot-high fountain at Tate Modern, exploring the historical tether between Africa, America and Europe with inspiration from the Victoria Memorial in London. Water, Tate says, has its own significance in the work, “referring to the transatlantic slave trade and the ambitions, fates and tragedies of people from these […]