Lost Art Press

  • by Lost Art Press
    I’m always on the lookout for local materials I can use to build stick chairs. Elm is my favorite wood, but it can be difficult to find for purchase. Last month Shea Alexander of Alexander Bros. gave me a couple boards of honey locust to try out for a chair seat. It looks a lot…
  • by Lost Art Press
    Typically, I’m not a fan of Print on Demand (POD) publishers who take low-quality scans of books in the public domain and sell them alongside antique books. I have been fooled a couple times and ordered a POD book by accident. But here is one exception. The Forgotten Books website in the UK is a…
  • by fitz
    The following Covington Mechanicals classes go on sale today at 10 a.m. Eastern. They will likely sell out quickly – some in seconds – so be ready to register. (But before you do, please check your calendar to make sure you can attend the class for which you want to register). If you don’t get…
  • by Lost Art Press
    We are thrilled to host Lie-Nielsen Toolworks this weekend for a Hand Tool Event at our storefront at 837 Willard St. in Covington, Ky. (Details here.) If this is your first trip to Covington, or you haven’t been here since the pandemic, there is a lot to chat about.  During the last five years, the…
  • by fitz
    Last summer, a mysterious package arrived for me in the mail. It was from Suzanne Ellison, whom you know better as Suzo, our indefatigable researcher, aka The Saucy Indexer. Inside was an incredible handmade book, written and illustrated by Suzo, “The Dream of the Joiner.” And it was furoshiki-wrapped (see below). Oh, that I had…
  • by fitz
    Comments are now closed. A reminder that Chris will answer the as-yet unanswered ones later tonight or tomorrow. It’s time for Open Wire, our almost-every-Saturday woodworking question and answer session! Next week, however, Open Wire will be in-person only at the Lie-Nielsen Hand Tool Event here in our shop. So if you have questions and…
  • by Lost Art Press
    About 2012, Ty Black and I developed some leather pockets for the inside of tool chests that would hold important stuff. One held a block plane. The other held pencils, pens, knives, 6” rule and other skinny things that could get lost in a tool chest. We never intended to make them for sale, but…